AA products / 1:35th Complete Kits

Our 1:35th scale full kits complement the vast product ranges of all the mainstream model manufacturers, and the wee guys like us too.

G001
£47.50

The Ordnance Q.F. 17 Pr. was produced from 1942 onwards, and was the best Allied anti-tank gun of WW-II, which was capable of destroying all German tanks at useful ranges. It was also by far the highest performing 76.2mm anti-tank weapon of WW-2.The flash produced when firing APDS ammunition earned the gun, and the later vehicles mounting it, the nickname ‘Firefly’. One standard WW-II towing vehicle was the Crusader Gun Tractor, and this excellent combination was deployed in Normandy after D-Day. Another very late war/Post war vehicle was the Albion FT15N low profile gun tractor. Post war the 17 Pr. was generally towed by turretless Stuart M3A3 tanks.

G003
£58.00

This little known ‘brother’ of the famous 5.5” medium artillery gun (G04) was designed and introduced after the loss of most of the Royal Artillery weapons in France during 1940, and introduced many modern features which made this one of the most reliable artillery guns of the WW-2, the lighter shell gave a range advantage over enemy artillery. The gun was first used in North Africa, and Italy and finally in N.W.Europe after D-Day.The weapon fired 55lb (25kg) HE shells up to 20,500 yards (18,800m). It served for many decades post-war in a training role, and was towed by the Matador artillery tractor, and post war by the Leyland Artillery tractor.

G004
£58.00

This famous medium artillery gun was designed and introduced after the loss of most of the Royal Artillery weapons in France during 1940, and introduced many modern features which made this one of the finest artillery guns of the WW-2 and post war era. The gun was first used in North Africa, and Italy and finally in N.W.Europe after D-Day. The weapon fired 100lb (45kg) HE shells up to 16,200 yards (14,813m).It served for many decades post-war and was towed by the Matador artillery tractor, and post war by the Leyland Artillery tractor.

G005
£68.50

This huge artillery gun was introduced after the loss of most of the Royal Artillery weapons in France during 1940, and combined a lined down 8” barrel on the old 8” Howitzer carriage. The marks 1-4 depend on the original carriage utilised for the conversion. The gun was first used in North Africa, and Italy and finally in N.W.Europe after D-Day.The weapon fired 200lb (91kg) HE shells up to 16,900 yards (15,505m), and as the complete gun weighed in excess of 10 tons, the standard towing vehicle was the huge Scammell R100 6x4 Heavy Artillery tractor (See our kit K102)

G006
£27.50

This 1/35th scale model kit in resin by Leon Hassing and Rob Tearle depicts the British 4.2 Inch heavy mortar, designed in 1941, originally for the delivery of chemical bombs by the Royal Engineers. From 1942 onwards it became the standard Infantry and Royal Artillery heavy mortar and the Loyd Carrier was chosen as the standard towing vehicle

G007
£42.50

This 1/35th scale model kit in resin by Leon Hassing and Rob Tearle depicts the British 4.2 Inch heavy mortar, designed in 1941, originally for the delivery of chemical bombs by the Royal Engineers. From 1942 onwards it became the standard Infantry and Royal Artillery heavy mortar and the Loyd Carrier was chosen as the standard towing vehicle

K010
£74.00

The Medium Mark-A Whippet was designed by Sir William Tritton duting 1917, and was known as the ‘Tritton Chaser’. Over 200 were produced during 1917-1918, and were first used in action on 24th April 1917. With a weight of 14 tonnes, Whippet could manage a top speed of 8mph (Fast in it’s day!). Many captured Whippets were used by the Germans, and after the war Whippets were used by the British South Russia Tank Detachment, The Red Army and the Imperial Japanese Army

K016
£74.00

A 1/35th scale model kit of Little Willie (developed from the No-1 Lincoln Machine) in resin and etched brass by Tim Babb. The model depicts Little Willie as she looks today*, and this model is based on Tim Babbs’ measurements of the real vehicle. Construction of this “Landship” was started in August 1915 at William Foster & Co. Ltd in Lincoln and tested for the first time in September of the same year

K024
£42.50

The 2pdr armed Tetrarch was designed in 1937 as the Light Tank Mk-VII, but is best known as the first airborne tank to be used in action. On D-day, 26 were landed at Ranville in support of the 8th Parachute Battalion actions around Pegasus bridge. Tetrarch was also used during the invasion of Madagascar in 1942, and a number were also supplied to the Red Army. One further point of interest is that this little tank was the first vehicle to swim using the now famous ‘DD’(Duplex Drive) system

K030E
£74.00

This comprehensive 1/35th scale model by Jon Bottomley has been reworked and re-released with interior detail, new etched brass detail set and a full set of colour decals. This version depicts the later Command and Recce M114A1/A1E1 as used in the Europe (ETO) and may be completed as the M114A1 with new cupola and remote operated 0.50 Cal MG or the M114A1E1 with 20mm cannon. A further version depicting the M114 as K030V is also available

K030V
£74.00

This comprehensive 1/35th scale model by Jon Bottomley has been reworked and re-released with interior detail, new etched brass set and a full set of colour decals. This version depicts the standard Command and Recce M114 in its’ original configuration for use in Vietnam. A further version depicting the M114A1 or M114A1E1 is also avilable as K030E

K031
£68.50

Developed from the FV1600 1 ton 4x4 Truck designed by the Humber Motor Car Company in the late 1940’s, the FV1611 was produced as a general purpose troop carrier. The requirement came about due to the high running and purchase costs of the Alvis Saracen. Over 1700 were constructed, and served in all British Army theatres of operation in the 1960’s and 1970’s. Many were modified for internal security duties, and served in N.Ireland

K033
£100.00

The FV432 APC was the most numerous British Post War AFV, designed by GKN as a ‘Battlefield taxi’ for infantry, similar to, but better protected and mobile than the American M113. The basic APC nicknamed ‘Trojan’, was produced between 1963 and 1971 and can carry a full section of infantry in addition to the two man crew. With the introduction of Warrior, the FV432 ceased to be used as an APC, but continued to serve in many units. A large number served in the Gulf War of 1990-91 and many still serve today in all British Army theatres of operation in newer re-built versions

K044
£68.50

Spartan was originally intended as the APC for specialist assault troops, and is now used to transport a variety of special teams, such as weapons teams with LTM, Milan, Radar etc and REME, Signals and Engineer specialists. The Spartan is still in service in all British Army Theatres of operation, including Operation Telic in Iraq 2003

K045
£74.00

Spartan MCT is a Tank Hunter vehicle armed with the MILAN missile system fitted in the Milan Compact turret (MCT), and was used for the first time during the Gulf War (Operation Granby) in 1990-1991. The Spartan MCT remained in service for many years but was withdrawn before Operation Telic in Iraq during 2003

K046
£68.50

Sultan is the Armoured Command Vehicle (ACV) version of the CVR(T) family and has a crew of up to six housed in a modified body with extra headroom and space for radios, batterias and map boards. External fittings include rear penthouse and elevation communication masts. The Sultan is still in service in all British Army Theatres of operation

K047
£74.00

Samson is the recovery vehicle specially designed for use with the other CVR(T) family members. This 3 man crew vehicle has a rear mouted earth anchor, internal winch and comprehensive recovery equipment.The Samson is still in service in all British Army Theatres of operation.